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Citation Style Guides

Contact Information

In person at the J.N. Desmarais Library: The Library User Assistance Desk is just to the left of the entrance to the library.

By email: Reference help is available by email at reference@laurentian.ca. A Librarian will respond during regular hours.

By telephone: Call us at 705-675-4803 or by extension 3242 or 4800.

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For more information visit our Services for Students page or the Off-Campus Library Services page.

Academic Integrity for Students at Laurentian University

Protect yourself against plagiarism, examine the policy - Academic Integrity for Students at Laurentian University (PDF), approved by Senate on December 14, 2010.

Citation Styles

In the following tabs, you will find quick reference guides on commonly used citation styles. These styles are most often derived from professional associations and researchers, some have official guides and others are merely popular names given to a type of style that has several variants. The three most popular reference styles used at Laurentian are APA, MLA, and Chicago.

Remember to always use the style asked of you by your professors.

Online Reference Tools

Online reference tools, such as Zotero, can help you to import and organize your references, as well as to create and export them. It is important to verify these citations before submitting your work, as glitches can lead to errors with capitalization, punctuation, and incomplete information.

Annotated Bibliography

Many professors ask for annotated bibliographies as part of your research. Annotated bibliographies ensure that you are accurately evaluating your sources and using reliable information; they help you improve your research abilities and prove your work.

There are several different styles of annotated bibliographies (informative, evaluative, combination...). It is therefore important to verify what form your professor requires. The University of Toronto offers an excellent guide on writing an annotated bibliography.

APA

APA is most often used in the Humanities and Social Sciences (such as Psychology and Information Studies). The 6th Edition of the Manual of the American Psychological Association is the most recent publication and is available at the Service Desk on the 2nd floor of the J.N. Desmarais Library. You could also consult the highly respected and up-to-date online APA reference guide from Purdue University.

APA Style uses the Author-Date system. For both cited and paraphrased in-text references, use (Author, Date, Pages) at the end of the sentence, otherwise, the author and date information is included within the text with the pages at the end of the sentence. Two authors require an ampersand; three to five authors require commas and one ampersand; and more than five authors list the first author followed by “et al.”

 

Short citation example (long citations have a hanging indent):

“So long as settler society perceived a need to tame Aboriginal sexuality, men in power could reorder Aboriginal society with impunity” (Barman, 2010, 284).

 

Example of paraphrasing (It is not required to include page numbers for paraphrasing, but it is recommended):

Barman (2010) expands on aboriginal sexual deceptions by institutions, giving documentary evidence of the depiction of uncontrollable sexuality (283-284).

 

N.B. APA uses a hanging indent (which is not replicated here).
Book

Author, A. A. (Year). Title of book: Capital used on the first word after the colon. Publication place: Publisher.

Obama, B. (2006). The audacity of hope: Thoughts on reclaiming the American dream. New York: Vintage Books.

Translated Book

Author, A. A. (Year). Title of book: Capital used on the first word after the colon. (Name(s) of translators, Trans.). Publication place: Publisher. (Original work published date).

De Saint-Exupéry, A. (1971). The little prince. (K. Woods, Trans.). San Diego: Harcourt, Brace, & World. (Original work published 1943).

Chapter in a Collected Works

Author, A. A. (Year). Chapter title. In Editor, B. (Ed.), Title of book: Capital used on the first word after the colon (pages). Publication place: Publisher.

Barman, J. (2010). Taming Aboriginal sexuality: Gender, power, and race in British Columbia, 1850-1900. In Kelm, M.-E. and Townsend, L. (Eds.), In the days of our grandmothers: A reader in Aboriginal women’s history in Canada (270-300). Toronto: University of Toronto Press.

Journal Article

Author, A. A., & Author, B. B. (Date). Article title. Journal title, volume(issue). Retrieved from URL or doi

Buchanan, B. (2007). The time of the animal. PhaenEx: Journal of Existential and Phenomenological Theory and Culture, 2(2), 61-80. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/43243630?accountid=12005

Newspaper Article

Author, A. A. (Year, Month day). Article title. Name of newspaper. Retrieved from URL

Smith, T. (2012, October 31). Drought-stricken Almonte farmer receives much-needed hay from Saskatchewan. Ottawa Citizen. Retrieved from http://www.ottawacitizen.com/news/ottawa/Drought+stricken+Almonte+farmer...

Data

Organisation. (Year). Project name if available [type of data]. Retrieved from URL

Statistics Canada. (2006). 2006 cumulative profile, provinces and territories in Canada: Common-law couples, couple families by family structure [data table]. Retrieved from http://estat.statcan.gc.ca/cgi-win/cnsmcgi.pgm

Wikis

Title of page. (Year, Month day). Retrieved Date from ___ Wiki: URL

Travel news. (2012, October 26). Retrieved November 7, 2012 from Wikitravel: http://wikitravel.org/en/Travel_news

Online Presentation /Conference

Author, A. A. (Year, Month day). Title of presentation [format]. Retrieved from URL

Brown, B. (2010, June). The power of vulnerability [video]. Retrieved from http://www.ted.com/talks/lang/en/brene_brown_on_vulnerability.html

Online Video

Author or Organisation. (Year, Month day). "Title of presentation". [format]. Retrieved from URL

ESPNInternational. (2011, March 6). "Roy Halladay All-Access." [YouTube]. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zv_9TlBs5Mg

Website

Author or Organisation. (Year, Month day). Page/document title. Retrieved from URL

Historica Dominion Institute. (n.d.). Richard Pierpoint. Retrieved from https://www.historica-dominion.ca/content/heritage-minutes/richard-pierp...

Blog

Author or screen name. (Year, Month day). Title of post [blog]. Retrieved from URL.

Geist, Michael. (2012, November 7). Canadian copyright reform in force: Expanded user rights now the law [blog]. Retrieved from http://www.michaelgeist.ca/content/view/6692/125/

 

The DOI (Digital Object Identifier)

When it is available, APA style requires the addition of a DOI (Digital Object Identifier) in a reference.  In essence, the DOI is a permanent link to the cited document when it is avaiable online.  For more see the chart below prepared by APA in 2009:

MLA

MLA style guide is most commonly used in the Humanities (such as modern languages, literature, media studies, etc.). The most recent version of the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers is the 8th Edition. It is available from the Service Desk on the 2nd floor of the J.N. Desmarais Library. You could also consult the highly respected and up-to-date online MLA reference guide from Purdue University.

When citing online references, you must list as much information as possible; however MLA does not require the addition URL or doi. General MLA reference guidelines:
  • Name(s) of the author and/or editor (if available)
  • Article title between quotation marks (if applicable)
  • Title of the website, project, or book in italics.
  • Publishing information, such as the editor and the date of publishment.
  • Page number(s) if available.
  • Method of publication.
  • Access date.
  • Use the abbreviation “n.p.” if the publisher is unknown to you and “n.d.” when the date is unknown. 
  • MLA’s bibliography is titled “Works Cited”, not “References” or “Bibliography”.
For both cited and paraphrased in-text references, use “(Author, Pages)” at the end of the sentence, otherwise the author and date information is included within the text with the pages at the end of the sentence. If the author is unknown, substitute the work. When listing a work with two authors use an ampersand; with more than three authors, list the first author followed by “et al.”

Short citation example (long citations have a hanging indent):

“So long as settler society perceived a need to tame Aboriginal sexuality, men in power could reorder Aboriginal society with impunity” (Barman 284).

Example of paraphrasing:

Barman expands on aboriginal sexual deceptions by institutions, giving documentary evidence of the depiction of uncontrollable sexuality (283-284).

 N.B. MLA uses hanging indents (which is not replicated here).

Book

Lastname, Firstname. Title of Book. Publication place: Publisher, year. Medium.

Obama, Barack. The Audacity of Hope: Thoughts on Reclaiming the American Dream. New York: Vintage Books, 2006.Print.

Translated Book

Lastname, Firstname. Title of Book. Trans. Translator’s Firstname Lastname. Place of publication: Publisher, Year. Medium.

De Saint-Exupéry, Antoine. The Little Prince. Trans. Katherine Woods. San Diego: Harcourt, Brace, & World, 1971. Print.

Chapter of a Collected Work

Lastname, Firstname. “Chapter Title.” Titre du Livre. Ed. Editor(s) name(s). Place of publication: Publisher, Year. Pages. Medium.

Barman, Jean. “Taming Aboriginal Sexuality: Gender, Power, and Race in British Columbia, 1850-1900.” In the Days of our Grandmothers: A Reader in Aboriginal Women’s History in Canada. Eds. Mary-Ellen Kelm and Lorna Townsend. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2010. 270-300. Print.

Journal Article

Lastname, Firstname, and Firstname Lastname. “Article Title.” Journal Title Volume.Issue (Year): pages. Database if applicable. Medium. Date accessed if applicable.

Buchanan, Brett. (2007). “The Time of the Animal.” PhaenEx: Journal of Existential and Phenomenological Theory and Culture, 2.2, 61-80. ProQuest. Web. 7 Nov. 2012.

Newspaper Article

Lastname, Firstname. “Article Title.” Newspaper day month Year: pages(if available) Medium. Date accessed if applicable.

Smith, Teresa. “Drought-Stricken Almonte Farmer Receives Much-Needed Hay from Saskatchewan.” Ottawa Citizen 31 Oct. 2012. Web. 7 Nov. 2012.

Digital File

Author, Name of work (in italics or between quotation marks depending on the format). Publisher (if applicable), date of creation. Format (i.e. JPEG, PDF, etc.).

Watson, Patrick. Je Te Laisserai des Mots. Secret City Records, 2010. MP3.

Online Presentation /Conference

Name of presenter. “Title of Presentation.” Name of conference and organization, location. Date. Description of the type of presentation (lecture, ceremony, etc.).

Brown, Brené. “The Power of Vulnerability.” Ted Talks, Houston. June 2010. Lecture.

Website

Author or Organisation (if available). Name of website. Version number (if applicable). Name of institution or organisation affiliated with the site, creation date. Web. Date consulté.

Historica Dominion Institute. Richard Pierpoint. n.d. Web. 7 Nov. 2012.

Blog

Author, screen name, or editor. “Title of Post.” Name of Website. Name of the organisation affiliated with the website. Posting date. Web. Date accessed.

Geist, Michael. “Canadian Copyright Reform in Force: Expanded User Rights Now the Law.” Michael Geist. 7 Nov. 2012. Web. 7 Nov. 2012

Chicago

The Chicago Manual of Style is most commonly used in Humanities and Social Sciences. The most recent version of Chicago is the 16th Edition which is available at the Information Desk on the 2nd floor of the J.N. Desmarais Library, or you may consult Purdue University’s well-respected and up-to-date online guide.

N.B. Chicago uses two different forms: the Author-Date system and the Notes and Bibliography system. The latter is the most commonly used in humanities. Turabian Style is based on the two Chicago forms, but it does not constitute Chicago. Make sure you use the proper style and form as requested by your professor.

In the following quick reference guide, we will be using Chicago Notes and Bibliography. For the first notation, include all of the source information: author, title, and publishing data. When citing a source a second time, include the author’s last name, the abbreviated title, and the pages. If a source is cited more than two times successively, use “Ibid.” followed by the page numbers (if differing). Notes are formatted as footnotes or endnotes beginning with “1.”

 

 

N.B. Chicago style uses hanging indents in its bibliography (which is not replicated here).
Book

Lastname, Firstname. Book Title. Location of publication: publisher, year.

Obama, Barack. The Audacity of Hope: Thoughts on Reclaiming the American Dream. New York: Vintage Books, 2006.

Translated Book

Lastname, Firstname. Book Title. Translated by Firstname Lastname. Location of publication: publisher, year.

De Saint-Exupéry, Antoine. The Little Prince. Translated by Katherine Woods. San Diego: Harcourt, Brace, & World, 1971.

Chapter in a Collected Work

Lastname, Firstname. “Chapter Title.” In Book Title, edited by Firstname Lastname, pages. Location of publication: publisher, year.

Barman, Jean. “Taming Aboriginal sexuality: Gender, Power, and Race in British Columbia, 1850-1900.” In In the Days of our Grandmothers: A Reader in Aboriginal Women’s History in Canada. Edited by Mary-Ellen Kelm and Lorna Townsend, 270-300. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2010.

Journal Article

Lastname, Firstname. “Article Title.” Journal Title Volume, no.# (year): pages. Accessed Month day, year (if applicable). URL or doi.

Buchanan, Brett. “The Time of the Animal.” PhaenEx: Journal of Existential and Phenomenological Theory and Culture, 2 no.2 (2007): 61-80. Accessed >November 7, 2012. http://search.proquest.com/docview/43243630?accountid=12005.

Newspaper Article

Lastname, Firstname. “Article Title.” Newspaper (place of publication), Month day, year. URL (if applicable).

Smith, Teresa. “Drought-Stricken Almonte Farmer Receives Much-Needed Hay from Saskatchewan.” Ottawa Citizen (Ottawa), October 31, 2012. http://www.ottawacitizen.com/news/ottawa/Drought+stricken+Almonte+farmer...

Online Presentation /Conference

Name of presenter. “Presentation Title if available.” Presented to Name of conference and organization, place, date. URL.

Brown, Brené. “The Power of Vulnerability.” Presented to Ted Talks, Houston, June 2010. http://www.ted.com/talks/lang/en/brene_brown_on_vulnerability.html.

Website

Author, screen name, or editor. “Title of page.” Website name, date last modified (if available). Date accessed (if not modified). URL.

Historica Dominion Institute. Richard Pierpoint. Historica Dominion Institute. Accessed November 8, 2012. https://www.historica-dominion.ca/content/heritage-minutes/richard-pierp...

Blog

Generally, blogs are listed in the notes and not the bibliography. However, if it is a blog of significance you may add it to your bibliography. If the title includes the word “blog” there is no need to repeat it within parentheses.

In the notes:
Author or screen name, “Title of Article,” Title of Blog (blog), creation date, URL.

Geist, Michael, “Canadian Copyright Reform in Force: Expanded User Rights Now the Law,” Michael Geist, November 7, 2012, http://www.michaelgeist.ca/content/view/6692/125/.

Harvard

The Harvard style uses an author-date system and is most commonly used in Sciences. The last name of the author and the date are cited within the text, with the complete details being included at the end of the paper in the bibliography.

There is no official guide for Harvard, which is a popular name for various forms of parenthetical referencing. The Anglia Ruskin University has a well-respected and up-to-date online version of one of the most popular guides for the Harvard System.

 

N.B. Harvard uses hanging indents (which is not replicated here).

 

Book

Author, A. A., Year. Title of book. Location of publication: Publisher.

Obama, B., 2006. The audacity of hope: Thoughts on reclaiming the American dream. New York: Vintage Books.

Translated Book

Author, A. A., year of original publication. Book title. Translated from Language by A. A. Translator, year of translated publication. Location of publication: Publisher.

De Saint-Exupéry, A., 1943. The little prince. Translated from French by K. Woods, 1971. San Diego: Harcourt, Brace, & World.

Chapter in a Collected Work

Author, A. A., year of chapter (if differs from book, otherwise book year). Title of chapter. In: A. A. Editor, ed. Year of book (if different). Book title. Location of publication: Publisher, pp. pages.

Barman, J., 2010. Taming aboriginal sexuality: Gender, power, and race in British Columbia, 1850-1900. In: M.-E. Kelm and L. Townsend, eds. In the days of our grandmothers: A reader in Aboriginal women’s history in Canada Toronto: University of Toronto Press, pp. 270-300.

Online Journal Article

Author, A. A. and Author, B. B., year. Title of article. Journal title, [e-journal] volume(issue), pages. Available from: Library Website name <URL> [viewed day month year].

Buchanan, B., 2007. The time of the animal. PhaenEx: Journal of Existential and Phenomenological Theory and Culture [e-journal], 2(2), pp.61-80. Available at: J.N. Desmarais Library and Archives <http://search.proquest.com/docview/43243630?accountid=12005> [viewed 7 November 2012].

Online Newspaper Article

Author, A. A., year. Title of article. Newspaper, [medium] additional date information, pages if available. Available from: <URL> [viewed day Month year].

Smith, T., 2012. Drought-stricken Almonte farmer receives much-needed hay from Saskatchewan. Ottawa Citizen, [online] 31 October. Available at: <http://www.ottawacitizen.com/news/ottawa/Drought+stricken+Almonte+farmer... [viewed 3 November 2012].

Website

Author or source, year. Name of page or document. [Medium] (date of last modification if available) Available at: <URL> [viewed day Month year].

Historica Dominion Institute. n.d. Richard Pierpoint. [online] Available at: <https://www.historica-dominion.ca/content/heritage-minutes/richard-pierp... [viewed 5 November 2012].

Blog

Author or screen name, year. Title of post. Name of Blogue, [medium] posting date. Available at: <URL> [viewed day Month year].

Geist, M., 2012. Canadian copyright reform in force: Expanded user rights now the law. Michael Geist, [online] 7 November. Available at: <http://www.michaelgeist.ca/content/view/6692/125/> [viewed 7 November 2012].

IEEE

The IEEE Editorial Style Manual is most commonly used in Engineering and technological sciences, the most recent version being from 2009. The references are listed by numerological order of the textual citations. IEEE possesses the following characteristics:

  • The first name (or initials) of the author is listed first.
  • Article and chapter titles take quotation marks.
  • Journal and book titles are in italics.
  • Journal titles are abbreviated according to ISSN.
  • References in the bibliography are listed according to the order that they appear in text (not alphabetically), and are numbered.
  • Use “et al.” when listing four or more authors. 
 
For citation information that cannot be found in The IEEE Editorial Style Manual, it is recommended that you consult The Chicago Manual of Style.
 
N.B. the Canadian Journal of Electrical and Computer Engineering (CJECE) follows the IEEE style with some exceptions. For more information on the CJECE Style Guide visit IEEE Canada.
 
In-text citation example: Several studies [9], [14], [15] (or [9, 14, 15]) exhibit different results…
Printed
Book

Author(s), Book Title, #ed. (if applicable), Place of publication: Publisher, year, pages.

[1] Barack Obama. The Audacity of Hope: Thoughts on Reclaiming the American Dream. New York: Vintage Books, 2006, p.36.

Chapter from a Collected Work

Author(s), “Chapter Title,” in Book Title, edition, volume. Ed. Editor. Place of publication: Publisher, year, pages.

[2] J. Barman, “Taming Aboriginal Sexuality: Gender, Power, and Race in British Columbia, 1850-1900,” in In the Days of our Grandmothers: A Reader in Aboriginal Women’s History in Canada. Eds. M.-E. Kelm and L. Townsend. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2010, pp. 270-300.

Journal Article

Author(s), "Article Title," Jour. Title, vol., no., pages, date.

[3] B. Buchanan, “The Time of the Animal," PhaenEx: J. Existent. Phenomenological Theory Culture, vol.2, no.2, pp.61-80. 2007.

Electronic Conventions on digital resource citations are constantly evolving. IEEE digital references are based significantly on the standard ISO 690: 2010, which is subject to modification. Generally, when referencing electronic sources, where possible one should identify: 1) the document, 2) the access medium (online, CD-ROM, etc.), 3) the access date, and 4) where it is available.
Online Journal Article

Author(s). (Year, month day). Article Title. Abbreviated Journal Title [Medium]. Vol(issue), pages. Available: URL.

[5] B. Buchanan. (2007). The Time of the Animal. PhaenEx: J. Existent. Phenomenological Theory Culture [Online]. 2(2), pp.61-80. 2007. Available: http://search.proquest.com/docview/43243630?accountid=12005

Ebook

Author(s). (Year, month day). Title (edition) [Medium]. Vol(issue). Available: URL.

Franco Pirajno. (2009). Hydrothermal processes and mineral systems [Online]. Available: http://www.springerlink.com/content/n22073/#section=172815&page=2&locus=89

Online Conference

Author(s). Title. Presented at Conference [Medium]. Available : URL.

Brené Brown. The power of vulnerability. Presented at Ted Talks Houston June 2010 [Online]. Available: http://www.ted.com/talks/lang/en/brene_brown_on_vulnerability.html.

Vancouver

Vancouver Citation Style (NLM)

The NLM Style Guide for Authors, Editors, and Publishers (or Vancouver Citation Style) is primarily used in medical research. The most recent edition for the NLM guide is the 2nd, released in 2007, for more in-depth citation questions, this edition should be consulted. Some key points regarding Vancouver references:

  • All authors are listed,
  • List as much information as possible when referencing websites,
  • Journal titles are abbreviated,
  • Quotation marks and italics are generally not used,
  • References are numbered within brackets by order of appearance. If a reference appears multiple times, it maintains its original number,
  • Titles of books should be presented in their original language [followed by a translation between brackets whenever possible], with the language listed at the end of the reference,
  • Titles of non-English journal articles should be translated into English and placed within brackets, title of the journal itself should be in the original language.

In-text citation example:

The new copyright reform bill has officially taken effect and with it the digital locks are in force, however there are some exceptions on those locks, such as with encryption research [9, 10].

Book

Author AA. Book title. Edition. Place of publication: Publisher; year.

Barack O. The audacity of hope: thoughts on reclaiming the American dream. New York: Vintage Books; 2006.
eBook

Author AA. Book title [medium]. Place of publication: Publisher; year [cited year mon day]. Available from: URL.

Marlatt GA, Witkiewitz K. Addictive behaviors: new readings on etiology, prevention, and treatment [Internet]. Washington D.C.: Am Psychol Assoc; 2009 [cited 2010 Dec 2]. Available from: http://books2.scholarsportal.info/viewdoc.html?id=/ebooks/ebooks0/apa/20...
Chapter of a Collected Work

Author AA, Author BB. Chapter title. In: Editor AA, editor. Book title. Place of publication : Publisher; year. p. pages.

Barman, J. Taming aboriginal sexuality: Gender, power, and race in British Columbia, 1850-1900. In: Kelm M-E and Townsend L, editors. In the days of our grandmothers: a reader in Aboriginal women’s history in Canada. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2010pp. 270-300.

Book in Two Languages

Author AA. Titre du livre = Title of book. Edition. Place of publication: Publisher; year. Languages.

Institut de Recherches Internationales Servier. Le génome : avancées scientifiques et thérapeutiques et conséquences sociales = The genome: scientific and therapeutic developments and social consequences. Paris: Elsevier; c2002. French, English.

Journal Article

Author AA, Author BB. Article title. Abbrev. Journal Title. Year month day; volume(issue): pages.

Buchanan B. The time of the animal. PhaenEx, 2007; 2(2), p. 61-80.

Online Journal Article

Author AA, Author BB. Article title. Abbrev. Journal Title [medium]. Year mon day [cited year mon day]; volume(issue): pages. Available from: URL

Buchanan B. The Time of the Animal. PhaenEx [Internet]. 2007 [cited 2009 May 7]; 2(2), pp.61-80. Available from: http://search.proquest.com/docview/43243630?accountid=12005.

Online Newspaper Article

Author AA. Article title. Newspaper [medium]. Year mon day [cited year mon day]; Section: [general location]. Available from: URL

Smith T. Drought-stricken Almonte farmer receives much-needed hay from Saskatchewan. Ottawa Citizen [Internet]. 2012 Oct 31 [cited 2012 Nov 5]; News: [Ottawa]. Available from : http://www.ottawacitizen.com/news/ottawa/Drought+stricken+Almonte+farmer...

Website

Author(s). Web site name [Medium]. Place of publication: Publisher; year [updated year Mon day; cited year Mon day]. Available from: URL

Health Canada. Drug and Health Products [Internet]. Heath Canada; 2012 [mise à jour 2012 Nov 2; cited 2012 Nov 11]. Available from: http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/dhp-mps/index-eng.php

Blog

Author(s). Blog title [medium]. Place of publication: Publisher. Year Mon day – [cited year Mon day]. Available from: URL

Geist M. Canadian copyright reform in force: expanded user rights now the law [Internet]. Ottawa: Michael Geist. 2012 Nov 7- [cited 2012 Nov 9]. Available from: http://www.michaelgeist.ca/content/view/6692/125/

 

Other Citation Guides

Additional Citation Styles

There are many other citation styles that are used both in Canada and abroad. Here are some key ones:

McGill
The McGill Guide, or more formerly the Canadian Guide to Uniform Legal Citation, is the most popular legal reference style used in Canada. Queen's University offers an excellent online guide for the most recent 7th Edition. You may also consult the 6th Edition print version available on the 2nd floor of the J.N. Desmarais Library. Be aware that there have been some significant changes since the 6th Edition. Be sure to use the edition required by your professor.
 
Turabian
Turabian Style modifies Chicago Style slightly to the needs of students, and can be found in print and online. Please note that it is not the same as Chicago; make sure you are using the style required by your professor.
 
Archives

The Archives of Ontario suggests the use of the pdf Guide to Citing Archival Records.